A once in a lifetime sighting

A once in a lifetime sighting

A couple of weeks ago field guide Greg Esterhuysen had stopped to look at a herd of Kudus and give his guests some information about them. After a few seconds, something caught his eye. There was a slight movement in the shadows of a small tree…A leopard!

The leopard was keeping a very close eye on the Kudus as they moved closer to her. She lay behind the small tree dead still in order to remain undetected. What unfolded was nothing short of spectacular.

When one of the younger Kudus got even closer it got distracted for a second and looked in the other direction, the leopard took its chance. She ran and before the Kudu even realized what was happening leaped into the air and managed to take hold of the kudu around its throat. Within minutes the Kudu was dead and the leopard dragged its meal away.

Right place at the right time as it is not often we get to see something like this. Here are the photos Greg Esterhuysen managed to get of the action.

Not just a floating balloon of hot air – Interesting facts about hot air ballooning

Not just a floating balloon of hot air – Interesting facts about hot air ballooning

  • The first passengers to go on a hot air balloon flight in 1783 were a rooster, duck and a sheep. All three passengers made it back to the ground unharmed.
  • The real reason for the champagne toast celebration after going on a hot air balloon flight. We might tell you it is to celebrate your safe flight and amazing experience but there is more to this tradition. In France the farmers were not too happy with hot air balloons landing on their farms, therefore, pilots started to take champagne with them on the flight to give to the farmer’s whose farms they landed on as a peace offering.
  • The Pilots cant steer the balloon they can move it up and down but as far as steering goes the direction the balloon goes depends on mother nature.
  • A hot air balloon consists of three parts: an envelope, basket (made from woven wicker or rattan) and burner system which creates an open flame by burning a mix of liquid propane and air.
  • The envelope of most balloons is made from nylon. Due to the fact that the melting point of nylon is approximately 230 degrees Celsius. The temperature inside the balloon usually stays below 120 degrees Celsius.
Highlights from April 2019

Highlights from April 2019

Every Game drive/Safari in the Pilanesberg is different, as field guides we drive through the gate and never know exactly what is going to happen. This all adds to the excitement as we head out on a game drive or Hot air balloon flight.

While people all over the world were looking for Easter eggs over the Easter weekend we were out looking for animals. April brought about quite a lot of rain… very unusual for this time of year as we are going into winter which is the dry season. With the rain, the dams are in good shape for winter. Here are some highlights from April we would like to share with you.

Did you know?

Did you know?

The word “hippopotamus” comes from the Greek word for “water horse” or “river horse,”. They can’t breathe underwater but can hold their breath for around 5 minutes.

Elephant herds are led by the oldest female known as the matriarch. Old bulls often roam on their own, or with a few other bulls in a bachelor herd. Elephants will often meet up at waterholes have a greeting and head their separate ways.

The African wild dog has some fascinating markings hence the other name used for them is the “African Painted dog”. Each fur pattern is unique to an individual and this can be used as a way of recognizing each other.

Highlights from March 2019

Highlights from March 2019

Every Game drive/Safari in the Pilanesberg is different, as field guides we drive through the gate and never know exactly what is going to happen. This all adds to the excitement as we head out on a game drive or Hot air balloon flight.

March school holidays kept us rather busy with families from all over the world joining us for activities. Here are some of the highlights:

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